On the inside, looking out.

micdotcom:

Here’s what sex — and other bodily functions — look like in an MRI machine

Ever wonder what’s really going on inside your body? And not just that lame classroom skeleton or those creepy, albeit kind of cool, Bodies exhibitions. No, you want something that really gives a good picture of what’s happening inside your body as you’re moving around… or as something is moving around inside your body.

To give us a better idea of what that kind of stuff looks like, Vox compiled snippets of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans that show just what’s actually happening inside your body in some everyday (and some NSFW) moments.

 Watch: Sex, birth, breathing and more

philamuseum:

Check out our art history courses in October, including “Introduction to Nineteenth-Century European Painting” and “History of Photography.” Find out more here. “The Death of Sardanapalus,” 1844, by Ferdinand-Victor-Eugène Delacroix

philamuseum:

Check out our art history courses in October, including “Introduction to Nineteenth-Century European Painting” and “History of Photography.” Find out more here.

The Death of Sardanapalus,” 1844, by Ferdinand-Victor-Eugène Delacroix

bookstorey:

Galaxy Magazine


Galaxy was the leading science fiction magazine of the 1950s and 1960s. Its first editor, H.L. Gold, is credited with being instrumental in raising the bar for literary standards in science writing by bringing to the genre a “sophisticated intellectual subtlety.” The stories he published were more sociological, psychological, or satirical than purely technological in nature. He also detested the muscularity of other leading science fiction publications and helped to attract more women to write science fiction.


Classic science fiction stories, such as The Fireman by Ray Bradbury (which later went on to become Fahrenheit 451) and part one of Time Quarry by Clifford D. Simak made their first appearance within the pages of Galaxy. The magazine is also widely regarded as a catalyst for the New Wave movement in science fiction of the 1960s and 1970s, which was characterized by experimentation and higher artistic sensibilities.


The magazine’s cover was equally influential. Gold veered away from traditional science fiction artwork, depicting muscular men and scantily clad women fighting monsters. Also, its inverted white “L” shape framing the cover went on to be imitated by several other magazines, including its main rival Astounding.


For further book scraps, please follow on Twitter.

bpod-mrc:

21 September 2014
Faulty Plumbing
We need perfect plumbing to carry blood, food, air and waste products to the right places in our body. How our tubes remain the right length when we’re changing shape as we grow is a puzzle that we’re just beginning to understand. In a recent study of fruit fly embryos, some were found to have a trachea [windpipe], that had grown too long, causing the kinks and bends we see in this highly magnified, false-coloured picture. Scientists discovered that a faulty gene had disturbed a natural balance between two forces – the growth of the membrane lining the inner surface of the trachea, which tends to stretch it lengthways, and resistance to this stretching action from the extracellular matrix, the springy structure between cells. The gradual adjustment of these balancing forces is believed to be how nature ‘precision engineers’ our tubes so that they grow with our bodies.
Written by Mick Warwicker
—
Image by Shigeo Hayashi, Edouard Hannezo and Bo DongRIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, JapanOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 3.0)Research published in Cell Reports, May 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

21 September 2014

Faulty Plumbing

We need perfect plumbing to carry blood, food, air and waste products to the right places in our body. How our tubes remain the right length when we’re changing shape as we grow is a puzzle that we’re just beginning to understand. In a recent study of fruit fly embryos, some were found to have a trachea [windpipe], that had grown too long, causing the kinks and bends we see in this highly magnified, false-coloured picture. Scientists discovered that a faulty gene had disturbed a natural balance between two forces – the growth of the membrane lining the inner surface of the trachea, which tends to stretch it lengthways, and resistance to this stretching action from the extracellular matrix, the springy structure between cells. The gradual adjustment of these balancing forces is believed to be how nature ‘precision engineers’ our tubes so that they grow with our bodies.

Written by Mick Warwicker

Image by Shigeo Hayashi, Edouard Hannezo and Bo Dong
RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Japan
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 3.0)
Research published in Cell Reports, May 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

by @natgeo via @PhotoRepost_app
charlessantoso:

Baba Yaga for the ‘Sketch Dailies’ topic :-) Nyihihihihihihi!

charlessantoso:

Baba Yaga for the ‘Sketch Dailies’ topic :-) Nyihihihihihihi!

(via fairytalemood)

(Source: lecompanion, via doctorwho)

“America is a British country. It’d be nothing without the British, and they know it.
[in response to “What about the Native Americans?”]
The Indians? Do they even exist anymore? Didn’t we kill them all?”

—   Junior Romance languages major (via shitrichcollegekidssay)

Oh. No.

fastcompany:

This month, the United States authorized airstrikes in Iraq. Video footage of a journalist’s brutal execution circulated through social media networks. War raged between government forces and pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine, and the death toll in Gaza escalated. A policeman fatally shot an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown, whose death incited protests and more violence. About 1,500 people died in one of the largest Ebola outbreaks in history. Robin Williams, who usually makes us laugh, took his own life.
This month really, really sucked.
Read More>

fastcompany:

This month, the United States authorized airstrikes in Iraq. Video footage of a journalist’s brutal execution circulated through social media networks. War raged between government forces and pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine, and the death toll in Gaza escalated. A policeman fatally shot an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown, whose death incited protests and more violence. About 1,500 people died in one of the largest Ebola outbreaks in history. Robin Williams, who usually makes us laugh, took his own life.

This month really, really sucked.

Read More>

Daily Show correspondent Michael Che tries to find a safe place to report from.

(Source: sandandglass, via feistyfeminist)