On the inside, looking out.

scientiflix:

Sleep Drunkenness Explained

Do you feel really disorientated when you wake up? 1 in 7 people suffer from ‘Sleep Drunkenness’.

BrainCraft is written and hosted by Vanessa Hill (https://twitter.com/nessyhill) for PBS Digital Studios

Uploaded by: BrainCraft.

doctorwho:

Forever reblog.

❤️

doctorwho:

Forever reblog.

❤️

(Source: seksiuzaylilaraskina)

fairytalemood:

"Disney Nightmare Princesses" by Thaís Silva

on tumblr

mothernaturenetwork:

In honor of National Coffee day, here’s a yummy recipe for Vegetarian French Onion Soup (Made with Coffee)

mothernaturenetwork:

In honor of National Coffee day, here’s a yummy recipe for Vegetarian French Onion Soup (Made with Coffee)

scientiflix:

Rotational Motion

Paul Andersen explains how a net torque acting on an object will create rotational motion. This motion can be described by the angular displacement, angular velocity, and angular acceleration. The linear velocity can be calculated by determining the distance from the axis of rotation. The net torque is equal to the product of the rotational inertia and the angular acceleration.

Uploaded by: Bozeman Science.

generic-art:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.

Wow.

(via captainssolo)

georgetakei:

Potter fans—the box stops here.
Source: Words, Words, Words

Teehee 😂

georgetakei:

Potter fans—the box stops here.

Source: Words, Words, Words

Teehee 😂

micdotcom:

Here’s what sex — and other bodily functions — look like in an MRI machine

Ever wonder what’s really going on inside your body? And not just that lame classroom skeleton or those creepy, albeit kind of cool, Bodies exhibitions. No, you want something that really gives a good picture of what’s happening inside your body as you’re moving around… or as something is moving around inside your body.

To give us a better idea of what that kind of stuff looks like, Vox compiled snippets of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans that show just what’s actually happening inside your body in some everyday (and some NSFW) moments.

 Watch: Sex, birth, breathing and more

philamuseum:

Check out our art history courses in October, including “Introduction to Nineteenth-Century European Painting” and “History of Photography.” Find out more here. “The Death of Sardanapalus,” 1844, by Ferdinand-Victor-Eugène Delacroix

philamuseum:

Check out our art history courses in October, including “Introduction to Nineteenth-Century European Painting” and “History of Photography.” Find out more here.

The Death of Sardanapalus,” 1844, by Ferdinand-Victor-Eugène Delacroix

bookstorey:

Galaxy Magazine


Galaxy was the leading science fiction magazine of the 1950s and 1960s. Its first editor, H.L. Gold, is credited with being instrumental in raising the bar for literary standards in science writing by bringing to the genre a “sophisticated intellectual subtlety.” The stories he published were more sociological, psychological, or satirical than purely technological in nature. He also detested the muscularity of other leading science fiction publications and helped to attract more women to write science fiction.


Classic science fiction stories, such as The Fireman by Ray Bradbury (which later went on to become Fahrenheit 451) and part one of Time Quarry by Clifford D. Simak made their first appearance within the pages of Galaxy. The magazine is also widely regarded as a catalyst for the New Wave movement in science fiction of the 1960s and 1970s, which was characterized by experimentation and higher artistic sensibilities.


The magazine’s cover was equally influential. Gold veered away from traditional science fiction artwork, depicting muscular men and scantily clad women fighting monsters. Also, its inverted white “L” shape framing the cover went on to be imitated by several other magazines, including its main rival Astounding.


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